12:20 am, samnbk
1 note
 Comments
picture HD
Ay, Guanajuato: los padres están obligados a darle alimentos a sus hijos “concebidos” (cc @BuenMadrazo).

Es parte del Código Civil de Guanajuato vigente hoy.

Ay, Guanajuato: los padres están obligados a darle alimentos a sus hijos “concebidos” (cc @BuenMadrazo).

Es parte del Código Civil de Guanajuato vigente hoy.


10:24 pm, samnbk
1 note
 Comments
text
Transgressive caregiving

Can family caregiving be a form of political resistance or expression? It can, especially when done by people ordinarily denied the privilege of family privacy by the state.

Feminist and queer theorists within law have, for the most part, overlooked this aspect of caregiving, regarding unpaid family labor as a source of gender-based oppression or as an undervalued public commodity. Consequently, prominent feminist and queer legal theorists have set their sights on wage work or sexual liberation as more promising sources of emancipation for women.  Although other legal feminists continue to focus on the problem of devalued family labor, these theorists tend to justify increased support for care work primarily on the benefits it confers on children and society, on liberal theories of societal obligation, on ending gender oppression, or on simple human needs.

This Article examines a less well-explored conception of family caregiving within the feminist and queer legal theory literature, revealing the way that family caregiving can be a liberating practice for caregivers qua caregivers. Specifically, care work can constitute an affirmative political practice of resistance to a host of discriminatory institutions and ideologies, including the family, workplace, and state, as well as patriarchy, racism, and homophobia. I label such political work “transgressive caregiving” and locate it most centrally—although not exclusively—in the care work of ethnic and racial minorities, gays and lesbians, and heterosexual men.

Transgressive caregiving occurs all around us, despite widespread attempts by state and federal lawmakers to domesticate it.  Unmarried parents now make up one-third of households with children less than eighteen years old, and unmarried parenthood is the predominant family form in the African-American community. Somewhere between one million and nine million children have at least one gay or lesbian parent in the United States. In 2003, 4.6 million couples cohabited outside of marriage, and children were present in about forty percent of those households. Finally, although I hesitate to paint too rosy a picture of recent improvements in the gendered division of household labor within marriage, men have increased their share of housework over the past few decades. These contexts illustrate that the conventional wisdom that caregiving is experienced primarily as a condition of patriarchal oppression, or even as a benign activity benefiting children and society, tells only part of the story.

My thesis regarding the transformative political potential of care is necessarily partial, for it relies on a view of care as a practice whose meaning is fluid and dependent upon the contexts in which it is performed. Caregiving is not one single thing, but a complex practice in dynamic relationship with other social practices and institutions. A woman who does significantly more housework and child care than her husband is likely to view caregiving work differently than an unmarried welfare recipient who wishes to gain an exception to her state’s workfare program in order to spend more time with her infant child or a lesbian choosing to bring a child into her family through alternative insemination. 

Even this wide range of examples does not fully capture the contingency of the meaning and experience of care. The experience of care is a function not only of the caregiver’s status—for example, “stay-at-home wife,” “welfare recipient,” “lesbian mother”—but also of the multiple and diverse relationships an individual caregiver has to institutions and people around her. So, for example, an African-American attorney who chooses to work part time so she can devote more time to her family challenges a host of gender, class, and race-based stereotypes that have historically served to subordinate women of color. Along the same lines, a gay man in an intimate relationship in which a relatively traditional division of household labor is practiced, with one partner serving as the primary breadwinner and the other serving as the primary stay-at-home parent, may nevertheless experience his wish to receive societal recognition of his family as an assertion of equal citizenship. And a married man who seeks a family leave from work may experience the request as a challenge to the male-breadwinner ideal, as will his employer in all likelihood, even though his wife may be doing the bulk of the domestic labor. Similarly, a woman’s efforts to convince a family law judge to value her unpaid domestic labor in a divorce proceeding challenges the class-based subordination of women perpetuated by divorce law, which works with gender to allow a male elite to retain property. Her argument remains potentially transformative even if the woman married and bore children in part due to heteronormative and repro-normative societal pressures and even if her argument may also reinforce traditional gender roles to some extent. Any group inequality, in short, intersects with others in complex ways.  As numerous scholars have established, no single aspect of identity is sufficiently stable to have fixed meanings, whether positive or negative. 

In keeping with this complexity and contingency, this Article departs from other legal feminist work, including my own, that has examined caregiving as a status largely corresponding with the categories “woman” or “mother.” Rather, drawing on standpoint epistemology and postmodern theory, I examine care work as a practice with transformative potential contingent on the situatedness of the caregiver. Such an approach has at least seven advantages: First, reconceptualizing care work as a practice with unstable and complex meanings engaged in by women, men, mothers, and nonmothers responds to feminist and queer critiques of essentializing sex or gender. Second, this conception of care builds bridges between feminist legal theory and queer and race theory. Third, viewing care work as a practice with political or expressive significance might protect families from unwanted state intervention, a concern that is particularly  [*6]  acute within racial and sexual minority communities. Fourth, reading political significance into the practice of care might serve as an additional basis to articulate a theory of rights for caregivers, building on accounts based on the public value of children, the state’s obligation to provide for the needs of its citizens, and gender discrimination. Fifth, such a conception may provide a richer and more positive account of caregiving work than can be conveyed by the story of gender oppression alone. Sixth, recognizing the political significance of transgressive caregiving work may provide a basis for articulating a theory of rights for transgressive caregivers while avoiding some of the disciplinary effects typical of formal equality justifications. Seventh and finally, thinking of care work as a practice that occurs outside of blood or marriage ties may serve to decenter the normative structure of the nuclear family.

Fragmento de ”Transgressive caregiving" de Laura T. Kessler

 


09:44 pm, samnbk
 Comments
picture HD
Este es el tipo de cosas que me vuelve loca de las feministas académicas del derecho gringas: por lo general empiezan sus artículos, preocupados por el derecho, con una historia. Su visión del derecho está entrelazada con la de la realidad. Siempre dan cuenta de lo que está detrás de la norma y lo que ésta acaba haciendo en la realidad. Un punto para muchos obvios, quizá. Pero para algunas tradiciones jurídicas, no lo es. 
(El fragmento es de Leigh Goodmark y su artículo, “Autonomy Feminism: An anti-essentialist critique of mandatory interventions in domestic violence cases”)

Este es el tipo de cosas que me vuelve loca de las feministas académicas del derecho gringas: por lo general empiezan sus artículos, preocupados por el derecho, con una historia. Su visión del derecho está entrelazada con la de la realidad. Siempre dan cuenta de lo que está detrás de la norma y lo que ésta acaba haciendo en la realidad. Un punto para muchos obvios, quizá. Pero para algunas tradiciones jurídicas, no lo es. 

(El fragmento es de Leigh Goodmark y su artículo, “Autonomy Feminism: An anti-essentialist critique of mandatory interventions in domestic violence cases”)


08:29 pm, samnbk
15 notes
 Comments
text
Mis diez (en realidad, trece) textos que más…

Mi problema con el reto de los 10 libros que más les han gustado, influido o impactado es que, por lo general, se asume que hay que incluir 1) libros que 2) sean de ficción. (O sea, su librodeficcióncentrismo.) (Lo siento, tenía que hacer el mal chiste.) 

Yo, por años ya, leo muy poca ficción. (Muy, muy poca.) (Mi dosis de ficción la suplo con series, por ahora.) Y creo que, más que libros, leo ensayos o artículos académicos, por no decir sentencias judiciales. (Ese sí que sería un reto: he tratado de nombrar tres –ya olvídense diez– sentencias que me han influido, impactado y/o gustado y no lo logro). 

He notado que cada vez más hay quienes refieren a libros que no son de ficción. Por ello me he permitido hacer una lista con los diez “textos” que más me han influido, impactado y gustado, de los que me acuerde… Porque esa es la otra: “cuando joven” llegué a leer varias novelas (de Benedetti, José Agustín, Henry Miller, Nabokov, Burroughs, Virginia Woolf y otres del estilo), pero no me acuerdo de nada de lo que leí. N-a-d-a. Me acuerdo que me gustaron (como fue el caso con “La borra del café”, “La tregua”, “El trópico de Capricornio”…), pero no me acuerdo bien a bien por qué o qué diablos pasaba en la trama. Así que esos no los cuento. Estoy incluyendo textos que quedaron taladrados no sólo en mi mente, sino en mi corazón. Que he releído –al menos múltiples de sus pasajes– más de una vez; que busco cómo incluirlos en clases, conversaciones, escritos propios. Textos que me han y siguen marcando, pues. 

Ah. Y no pongo diez, sino doce (trece, en realidad). 

1. El paraíso en la otra esquina de Mario Vargas Llosa. Además de maravillarme con la historia de Flora Tristán y Paul Gaugin, las escenas eróticas: 
2. La llama doble de Octavio Paz. Mi aproximación al amor y al erotismo nunca fue igual. 
3. Only Words de Catharine MacKinnon. Vino a joder lo que Paz, Bataille y otros del estilo habían construido. Me cambió mi visión del sexo, del porno, del feminismo y del derecho. Lo leí una noche y procedí a escribirle a Alejandro Madrazo Lajous –por quien lo leí– una diatriba sobre por qué estaba MacKinnon equivocada. Todo mi tumblr se explica por este libro. Por no decir gran parte de mis exploraciones teóricas de los últimos años. Es imposible ser indiferente a este libro. (Lo hermoso de MacKinnon es lo bello que escribe; o, al menos, que escribe mejor que la gran mayoría de los académicos. @sandra_barba diría, siguiendo a Wendy Steiner, que su prosa es pornográfica.)
4. “Reflexionando sobre el sexo: Notas para una teoría radical de la sexualidad” de Gayle Rubin. Todo lo que MacKinnon había logrado, Rubin lo vino a derrumbar. Pocos textos tan útiles para argumentar con los conservadores de la sexualidad.
5. Testo Yonqui de Beatriz Preciado. Marcó un antes y un después en la manera en la que veo a los cuerpos. 
6. The Alchemy of Race and Rights: Diary of a Law Professor de Patricia J. Williams. A la mitad de una educación civilista, formalista y árida, despreocupada por lo que le da vida al derecho y por aquello a lo que el derecho le da vida, este libro me hizo saber que las cosas no tenían por qué ser así. Me hizo amar al derecho, por sus cracks, sus historias, sus posibilidades, sus desaciertos, sus triunfos: porque es algo vivo, que nosotros creamos. 
7. “Nomos and narrative” de Robert Cover. Como el libro de Williams, este texto de Cover me ofreció una visión del derecho –y su relación con la sociedad– que todos los días agradezco: el derecho como una historia. Un cuento. Una epopeya. 
8. Putting Liberalism in Its Place de Paul Kahn. Su quinto capítulo –sobre el amor y la familia (y la incapacidad del liberalismo de explicarlos)– lo he releído infinidad de veces.
9. The Dream de Drew Hansen, sobre el discurso proferido por Martin Luther King. Otro que devoré en una noche. Que me hizo vivir el antes y el después de ese discurso; que, en cada una de sus letras, de sus versos, de sus estrofas, me hizo entender la lucha de una nación. 
10. The Book of Job, traducido por Stephen Mitchell (incluida su introducción). Quedó tatuado en mi brazo. ¿Qué más puedo decir? (Supongo que mucho. Pero por este momento, refiero simplemente a la interpretación de Mitchell de las últimas palabras de Job a Dios.)
11. El miedo a la libertad de Erich Fromm.  Si bien me lo recetó mi psicoanalista como self-help, acabó transformando mi visión sobre la relación entre uno y el sistema en el que uno vive. 
12. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire y Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince de Jo Rowling. Yo no fui de las que devoró los libros antes de las películas; me esperé a que acabara la franquicia fílmica para echarme los libros. (Les digo que tengo problemas leyendo ficción.) Me eché los siete en unos cuantos meses. Los que sí devoré fueron el cuarto y el sexto. Sobre el cuarto: la explicación de las diferencias entre las especies y “clases” de magos me enloqueció, sigo esperando la manera de utilizarlo en una clase o escribir algún ensayo al respecto; y S.P.E.W. y la perfección de Hermione Granger como mujer ideal. Sobre el sexto: la infancia de Voldemort y la explicación de cada horcrux y –me sale lo ñoña– toda la explicación sobre la relación entre el mundo mágico y el no-mágico. 

Y ya.


06:20 pm, samnbk
45 notes
 Comments
text

La felicidad de usar ropa con la que te sientes cómoda. De saber que encajas (en ella; en tu propia concepción de ti). De sentir cómo es la ropa la que se adapta a ti y no tú la que (infructuosamente, debo decirlo) trata de adaptarse a ella.

Por mucho tiempo supe que lo mío rara vez serían los vestidos. Intenté que lo fueran. Vaya si no: cuántas fiestas, graduaciones y otros eventos no desperdicié sintiéndome incómoda –ridícula incluso– por tratar de tener el cuerpo, el estilo, la movilidad específica que muchos vestidos requerían y que yo, claramente, no tenía (o que no sentía que tenía; lo que, para estos efectos, es lo mismo. Si hay un ámbito en el que lo que importa es cómo uno se siente, es éste: el del propio cuerpo y todo lo que lo adorna). Fueron muchos los eventos –los años– perdidos en la incomodidad. Hasta que dije ya no más.

Tuve la suerte de ir encontrando atuendos que me gustaran. Tenía que buscarlos, armarlos: como piezas de un rompecabezas que iba comprando de tienda en tienda. Tarea que se dificulta entre más se salga uno de las normas de la moda comercial (de las cuales el género es sólo una). Así le hice para mi graduación universitaria: un pantalón de un lado, una camisa de tux de otro, tirantes de aquí, zapatos de allá y listo.

Ahora tengo la suerte de que una persona cercana a mí se dedica a hacer vestidos… y trajes. Y que, lo que le pido, me lo hace (como el traje que está al inicio de este post, que usé para una boda).

No soy de las que cree que la ropa es algo trivial. Es algo que nos acompaña (casi) todo el tiempo. Tiene el potencial de ser una forma maravillosa de expresar lo que somos, hacemos, pensamos, creemos; o, al revés: de limitarnos, más que liberarnos; de traicionarnos, más que ser nuestro fiel reflejo. De ahí que me de gusto que cada vez haya más diversidad en la moda que se produce. Que se multipliquen las fuentes de inspiración. Las posibilidades para ser –o habitarse–.

En la ropa, como en el porno y en la democracia, entre más (opciones), mejor. 

 

 


11:26 am, samnbk
2 notes
 Comments
picture
hablando de las NoMo…

hablando de las NoMo


picture HD

(Source: buphotography)


11:54 pm, samnbk
1 note
 Comments
video

"So I figure if we’re going to run our businesses like it’s the 1960’s, I’m going to act like it." WILL YOU MARRY ME, CHRISTINA HENDRICKS?


10:03 pm, samnbk
16 notes
 Comments
video

<3 Qué bien se ve de butch. Gracias a @yosoyene por pasarme este video de Ruby Rose.


05:09 pm, samnbk
4 notes
 Comments
video

Neta no se lo pierdan: What Men Are Really Saying When Catcalling Women


11:26 pm, samnbk
5 notes
 Comments
picture HD

11:35 am, samnbk
12 notes
 Comments
picture
But dad, Batgirl is cool!

But dad, Batgirl is cool!


04:08 pm, samnbk
14 notes
 Comments
photoset

picture

photoset

(Source: red-skyes)