06:22 pm, samnbk
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okay. me dio risa. 
(vía Ana de Alejandro García en facebook.)

okay. me dio risa. 

(vía Ana de Alejandro García en facebook.)



picture

(Source: dirty-m-i-n-d)


08:16 pm, samnbk
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wifebeaters, tats and general butchiness. las fotos son de @fercasillas. (síganla en instagram) amo sus fotos. y cómo canta, también. (síganla en youtube también.) 


07:32 pm, samnbk
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It says something that when people explain why there are so few Asian-Americans in college basketball today, they summon the very tropes that once were used to explain why there were so many Jewish players. Jews are so crafty and short; of course they’d succeed at basketball! Asians are so intelligent and short; why would they be playing basketball?

Stereotypes rest on observations that appear to be superficially true: a lot of top basketball players are black. But over time, stereotypes transform from observations of patterns into rules, and eventually into self-reflexive explanations for those rules. Stereotypes become self-reinforcing. A lot of top basketball players are black because black folks are innately better at basketball. Eventually, they actually blind us to the complex mix of sociological, economic and historic circumstances that undergird those patterns.

It’s why a question like that — “Why are there so few Asian-Americans in Division I basketball?” — is worth asking. It’s the type of question that exposes where our stereotypes have disguised themselves as explanations, and lets us search for the real explanations, in all their complexity.


07:06 pm, samnbk
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What? Am I empowered? I don’t know…are you? What does this even mean?! 

Extraído de Being a Sex Worker in Academia Who Doesn’t Care About Empowerment 

What? Am I empowered? I don’t know…are you? What does this even mean?! 

Extraído de Being a Sex Worker in Academia Who Doesn’t Care About Empowerment 


07:05 pm, samnbk
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Christina’s brief history exploring feminism. Extraído de Being a Sex Worker in Academia Who Doesn’t Care About Empowerment vía crislopezg

Christina’s brief history exploring feminism. Extraído de Being a Sex Worker in Academia Who Doesn’t Care About Empowerment vía crislopezg


12:31 pm, samnbk
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Tomboy pintarrajeado.

La foto se la debo a @fercasillas.

Tomboy pintarrajeado.

La foto se la debo a @fercasillas.

01:04 am, samnbk
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It’s not warm when she’s away.

(Nunca había escuchado la versión sin violines.)


08:56 pm, samnbk
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Mis abuelos paternos el día de su boda (1955).

Mis abuelos paternos el día de su boda (1955).


02:52 pm, samnbk
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The “sex work is work” cliché is that prostitution is much like any other service job—being a waitress is the usual example. I dunno how many waitresses would agree with that, and I don’t think anyone at Jacobin is asking them. But seriously, is it just prudery or fear of arrest or attack or stigma that keeps the vast majority of women working straight jobs? Maybe there’s a difference between a blowjob and a slice of pie—one that is occluded when all types of service work are collapsed into one, a difference that today’s young left feminists don’t want to think about. To acknowledge that sex work is exploitative—that it involves a particularly intimate form of male privilege, which bleeds into other areas of life—would be too sentimental, and too disturbing. It would mean, for example, thinking not just about the exhilarating figure of the sex worker but about the customer. This faceless man could be anyone: your colleague, your boyfriend, your father, your husband. Theoretically, if it’s OK to be a sex worker, it’s OK to be a john—after all, sex workers would be jobless without them. Do pro–sex work feminists really think that, though? I’d like to see an issue of Jacobin devoted to first-person accounts of buying sex. But men of the left seem content to let women fight the commercial sex battle for them. It’s chicks up front all over again.

It’s one thing to say sex workers shouldn’t be stigmatized, let alone put in jail. But when feminists argue that sex work should be normalized, they accept male privilege they would attack in any other area. They accept that sex is something women have and men get (do I hear “rape culture,” anyone?), that men are entitled to sex without attracting a partner, even to the limited extent of a pickup in a bar, much less pleasing or satisfying her. As Grant says, they are buying a fantasy—the fantasy of the woman who wants whatever they want (how johns persuade themselves of this is beyond me). But maybe men would be better partners, in bed and out of it, if they couldn’t purchase that fantasy, if sex for them, as for women, meant finding someone who likes them enough to exchange pleasure for pleasure, intimacy for intimacy. The current way of seeing sex work is all about liberty—but what about equality?

I thought the left was about that, too


12:25 pm, samnbk
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hablando de igualdad… (?) MON DIÚ. Dom Nader v. Miranda Kerr. vía @CGaribi


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littl3-lov3y:

calliopesmuse:

glencocobro:

sizvideos:

Watch Honey Maid’s awesome answer about the backlash they received 

so powerful

This is beautiful and perfect and EXACTLY as the world should be.

🙏


12:30 pm, samnbk
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La discriminación que sufren profesores/as LGBT en las escuelas. Y el Ministro Scalia, como siempre, imperdible. 

Extraído de Suzanne E. Eckes & Martha M. McCarthy, “GLBT Teachers: The Evolving Legal Protections”.


10:19 am, samnbk
reblogged
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La trabajadora sexual no pone su cuerpo en venta, sino que transforma, como lo hacen los osteópatas, el actor o el publicista, sus recursos somáticos y cognitivos en fuerza de producción viva. Como el osteópata, ella/él usa sus músculos, y él/ella realiza una succión con su boca, con la misma precisión que el osteópata manipula el sistema musculo-esquelético de su cliente. Como el actor, su práctica resalta su capacidad de teatralizar una escena de deseo. Como el publicista, su trabajo consiste en crear formas específicas de placer a través de la comunicación y la relación social. Como todo trabajo, el trabajo sexual es el resultado de una cooperación entre sujetos vivos basada sobre la producción de símbolos, de lenguaje y de afectos.
Extracto de “Derechos de las mujeres al trabajo… sexual” de Beatriz Preciado (via mmmmmmm404)